Working in Partnership

OECD TALIS: OECD Teaching and Learning International Survey

Overview

The OECD Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) focuses on the learning environment and working conditions of teachers in schools. It offers an opportunity for teachers and school principals to provide data for education analyses and policy development. The number of participating countries and economies has continued to grow over the 2008, 2013 and 2018 cycles, with more than 45 participating in the 2018 survey. Cross-country analyses provide opportunities not only to identify countries with similar challenges in relation to about 10 thematic areas (including school leadership, instructional practices, job satisfaction, and teaching in diverse environments) but also to learn from related policy approaches.

TALIS aims to collect trend data covering educational key issues every five years using a cross-sectional design. The study also seeks to gather data concerning relevant contemporary policy issues that emerge from one cycle to the next.

For additional information, please visit the OECD TALIS website.

Our partners

Following the successful implementation of TALIS 2008 and 2013 by an IEA-led partnership between the IEA and Statistics Canada in Ottawa, Canada, the consortium for TALIS 2018 was expanded, and now also includes the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER) in Melbourne, Australia.

The IEA’s contribution

As the international study center for OECD TALIS, the IEA manages communication and collaboration between the consortium partners, as well as with the study’s national project managers and their teams.

The IEA also implements or coordinates all survey operations tasks, such as sampling; translation and verification; development of manuals, guidelines, and software; monitoring of data collection; and international data processing and analysis. The IEA furthermore provides consultation and training services in the participating countries in various fields, including national sampling design, field operations, data management, and data analysis, and in relation to general methodological and statistical issues.

The consortium’s scope of work with regard to TALIS 2018 also includes the conceptual development of the survey as well as convening and chairing the questionnaire expert group (QEG). The QEG has been commissioned with developing the study’s framework, questionnaires, and analysis plan in preparation for the intended reporting of study findings in June 2019.

Contact

Ralph Carstens +49 40 48500 607 or Dr Steffen Knoll +49 40 48500 605 – talis [at] iea-dpc.de


OECD TALIS: Starting Strong Survey

Overview

The OECD TALIS Starting Strong Survey is an international large-scale survey focusing on early childhood education and care (ECEC) staff, their professional development, their work with young children, the ECEC environment, and the impact that staff can have on the children in their care.

Building on the OECD Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) survey of the teaching profession, this new survey seeks to identify strengths and opportunities for early childhood learning and well-being environments across different countries and jurisdictions. It also aims at informing and facilitating policy discussions to re-think staff’s work organization and enhance the overall quality of the workforce.

The survey offers an opportunity for ECEC staff and center leaders to provide data that will enable cross-country analyses and support future policy development.

Our partners

The OECD TALIS Starting Strong Survey consortium consists of three partners: the IEA; RAND Europe in Cambridge, United Kingdom; and Statistics Canada in Ottawa, Canada.

The IEA’s contribution

As the international study center for the OECD TALIS Starting Strong Survey, IEA manages the communication and collaboration between consortium partners, as well as with the study’s national project managers and their teams. The IEA is responsible for implementing or coordinating all survey operations tasks, including: sampling; translation and verification; development of guidelines, manuals, and software; monitoring of data collection; and international data processing and analysis. The IEA furthermore provides consultation and training services in the participating countries in various fields, including national sampling design, field operations, data management and data analysis, or with respect to general methodological and statistical issues.

Contact

Juliane Hencke +49 40 48500 701 – startingstrongsurvey [at] iea-dpc.de


OECD PIAAC: Programme for International Assessment of Adult Competencies

Overview

The Programme for International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC), commissioned by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), examines the skills of adults as a way of investigating the link between skills and outcomes in educational, social, and labor-market contexts. The study to date consists of three cycles: 2008–2013, 2012–2016, and 2015–2019.

The assessment measures the literacy and numeracy skills of people between the ages of 16 and 65 and also looks at how well these individuals solve problems in technology-rich environments. The study aims, in particular, to provide the more than 30 participating countries with a profile of their adult population in terms of the knowledge, skills, and competencies that are thought to underlie personal and societal success. A second important aim is to help identify the factors policymakers could address to enhance these competencies.

For additional information, please visit the OECD PIAAC website.

Our partners

The PIAAC consortium, led by Educational Testing Service (ETS) in Princeton, United States, also consists of Westat in Rockville, United States, cApStAn in Brussels, Belgium, the Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA) at the University of Maastricht in the Netherlands, the Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences (GESIS) in Mannheim, Germany, the German Institute for International Education Research (DIPF) in Frankfurt, Germany, and the IEA.

The IEA’s contribution

The IEA contributes to PIAAC by providing software for national-level data management tasks (such as collating and verifying sampling information, response data, and paradata from computer- and paper-based assessments and interviews), as well as related manuals, guidelines, and technical standards, along with international data harmonization, processing, and support for analyses. The IEA also provides participating countries with consultancy and training services in various fields, including data management and validation, occupational coding, data analysis, and other methodological and statistical matters.

Contact

Tim Daniel +49 40 48500 719 – piaac [at] iea-dpc.de


PRIDI: Programa Regional de Indicadores de Desarrollo Infantil

Overview

The Programa Regional de Indicadores de Desarollo Infantil (PRIDI) was a regional program that collected and analyzed comparable data and indicators on early childhood development (ECD) in Latin America in order to gain deeper insights into the situations of young children and their families.

The study measured, in each participating country, levels of child development for children between 24 and 59 months of age. Data collection instruments included interviews with children and their parents/guardians in their homes in 2013. The study also provided benchmarks to assist policymakers identify the comparative strengths and weaknesses of ECD and “readiness to learn networks” in their respective countries.

For additional information, please visit the IDB PRIDI website.

Our partners

PRIDI was coordinated by the Inter-American Development Bank (IADB), which commissioned the IEA to provide assistance and advice on all aspects of the study’s design and implementation.

The IEA’s contribution

As a subcontractor, the IEA developed strategies and software to ensure standardized, state-of-the-art sampling, data collection, and data-processing procedures. The IEA also provided the participating countries with consultancy and training services in data management and international database analyses. The services also covered matters relating to general methodological and statistical issues.

Contact

Oliver Neuschmidt +49 40 48500 705 – pridi [at] iea-dpc.de


PISA: Programme for International Student Assessment

Overview

In compliance with a decision made by the Ministers for Culture and Education of its federal states, the Federal Republic of Germany participates in the PISA International School Proficiency Study.

PISA is part of the Indicators of Educational Systems (INES) programs run by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). The program aims to periodically provide OECD member states with comparative data on the proficiency of their education systems. It surveys performances worldwide and across all school types in the areas of reading comprehension, mathematics, and the sciences.

PISA is a cyclical study. The first cycle took place in the year 2000, and has been followed by three-year cycles ever since. Before each cycle, new test questions and procedures are trialed in preliminary studies. The findings of these field tests determine which test questions and procedures will be used in the following main survey.

Extensive information about the international PISA study can be found at the PISA website.

Our partner

Since PISA 2015, the Center for International Student Assessment (Zentrum für internationale Bildungsvergleichsstudien, ZIB), led by Professor Dr Kristina Reiss at the Technical University Munich (TUM), has been responsible for managing Germany’s participation in the PISA International School Proficiency Study.

The IEA’s contribution

The IEA’s contribution consists of field operations, coding, and data management for the PISA surveys in Germany.

Contact

Dr Lars Borchert +49 40 48500 641 – pisa [at] iea-dpc.de


NEPS: National Educational Panel Study

Overview

The main focus of NEPS is to investigate educational processes, educational decisions, and educational outcomes over the entire lifespan of the study, which began in 2010 with various different cohorts. NEPS surveys approximately 60,000 people annually in Germany. Study participants range in age from 0 to 67 years. NEPS includes pilot studies and main surveys. The pilot studies (also known as development studies) check whether the developed test items, questions, and approaches will prove successful in the actual survey situation. The main surveys collect actual data.

More detailed information on this study can be found at the NEPS website.

Our partner

Until July 2012, NEPS was managed by Professor Dr Hans-Peter Blossfeld. Since August 2012, the study has been managed by Professor Dr Hans-Günther Roßbach, director of the Leibniz Institute for Educational Trajectories (LIfBi) at the University of Bamberg. The LifBi coordinates the interdisciplinary network of excellence of the more than 200 scientists from numerous institutes and universities who work on the study.

The IEA’s contribution

The IEA’s contribution consists of sampling, field operations, data coding, and data capturing and processing at the preschool and school stages of the study.

Contact

Svenja Bundt +49 40 48500 601 – neps [at] iea-dpc.de


Monitoring Educational Standards

Overview

In 2003 and 2004, Germany’s Standing Conference of State Ministers of Education and Culture (KMK) issued a set of educational standards for primary and early secondary education applicable to all of the country’s 16 states. In 2012, the KMK set educational standards for Germany’s general matriculation qualification.

The educational standards are aimed at contributing to quality development and quality control in the German education system. They therefore define the competences that students should have developed by a certain stage in their school career.

Since 2006, the Institute for Educational Progress (IQB) has regularly conducted nationwide comparisons across the federal states to test whether and to what extent these learning goals are being attained. The test questions developed for this purpose are trialed beforehand by way of pilot studies.

The IQB standardization studies are conducted on representative samples in order to determine the level of difficulty of the test questions. The results of these studies also allow the development of competence stages, thus providing a uniform basis for the categorization of student performance.

Further information about the educational standards is available at KMK and IQB.

Our partner

Overall responsibility for the monitoring lies with the IQB at the Humboldt University in Berlin. The IQB was led by Professor Dr Olaf Köller until 2009. Since 2010, study management has been in the hands of Professor Dr Petra Stanat and Professor Dr Hans Anand Pant.

The IEA’s contribution

The IEA’s contribution to the monitoring of educational standards consists of sampling, field operations, data coding, and data capturing and processing.

Contact

Maren Meyer-Everdt +49 40 48500 606 – bs [at] iea-dpc.de 


StEG: Study on the Development of all-day Schools

Overview

The Study on the Development of all-day Schools (StEG) was launched by the German Federal Ministry for Education and Research (BMBF) in 2005. As the largest longitudinal study on all-day schools in Germany, StEG has accompanied students, their parents and teachers, school managers and ancillary educational personnel at all-day schools for 10 years.

The aim of the first phase (2005–2011) was to study the work and basic conditions at all-day schools as comprehensively as possible over a longer period of time in order to obtain a basis for specific school development efforts and their implementation in education policy. The second phase (2012–2015) focused on the conditions under which children and young people can learn most effectively at all-day schools. This phase consisted of a number of mutually complementary and contextually related part studies so that the results could be used by all parties.

Extensive information about the study can be found at the StEG website.

Our partners

StEG was implemented under the academic supervision of Professor Dr Eckhard Klieme from the German Institute for International Educational Research (DIPF) in Frankfurt/Main, Professor Dr Heinz Günter Holtappels from the Institute for School Development Research (IFS) of the Technical University Dortmund, and Professor Dr Thomas Rauschenbach from the German Youth Institute (DJI) in Munich. It was funded by:

 

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The IEA’s contribution

The IEA’s contribution to StEG comprises the preparation and implementation of the field operations, data entry, and data management.

Contact

Nina Hugk +49 40 48500 615 – steg [at] iea-dpc.de


BERLIN Study

Overview

At the beginning of the 2010/2011 school year, Berlin implemented a structural reform in its schools. This reform included the amalgamation of Berlin’s various types of secondary schools into just one newly established type of school. The BERLIN Study was initiated to evaluate these structural changes and their impact on educational decision making and educational processes. The study, which consists of three modules, has been ongoing since 2011.

Further information about the study is available at the BERLIN website.

Our partners

Responsibility for the scientific management of the BERLIN Study lies with Professor Dr Jürgen Baumert from the Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung (MPI), Berlin, and Professor Dr Kai Maaz from the Deutsches Institut für Internationale Pädagogische Forschung (DIPF), Berlin. Professor Dr Olaf Köller from the Leibniz-Institut für die Pädagogik der Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik (IPN) in Kiel also plays a supporting role with respect to the implementation of Module 2 and Module 3.

The IEA’s contribution

The IEA’s contribution includes preparation and implementation of the random sampling, field operations, data coding, and data management.

Contact

Cornelia Kutter +49 40 48500 629 – berlin-studie [at] iea-dpc.de


ManKobE: Mathematics and Science Competencies in Vocational Education and Training

Overview

The objective of ManKobE is to learn more about the significance of school-acquired mathematical and scientific competences for initial vocational training in MINT professions (Mathematics, Information Technology, Natural Sciences, and Technology).

ManKobE is a longitudinal study that began in 2012 with a total of four points of measurement: one each at the beginning, in the middle, and at the end of vocational training; the final survey will be taken by post, after completion of training (i.e., without involving the schools). A sample of 3000 trainees from a choice of eight training programs is being assessed in five of the German federal states. In addition, the head trainers in each of the participating training programs are asked to evaluate the tests.

More detailed information can be found at the Mankobe website.

Our partners

Overall responsibility for ManKobE lies with Professor Dr Olaf Köller and Professor Dr Jan Retelsdorf at the Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education (IPN) at the University of Kiel. The study is conducted in cooperation with the IPN, the University of Stuttgart (Professor Dr Reinhold Nickolaus), and the University of Paderborn (Professor Dr Esther Winther).

The IEA’s contribution

The IEA’s contribution to ManKobE consists of tasks associated with sampling, field operations, data coding, and data management.

Contact

Oriana Mora +49 40 48500 631 – mankobe [at] iea-dpc.de